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X-ray energy is used in a similar manner to radiography in CT scanning. In CT imaging, the x-ray tube rotates quickly around the patient, within the gantry. The detectors rotate in a synchronized manner, on the opposite side of the gantry, absorbing the x-rays that pass through the patient. Based on the absorbed or detected energy, the computer builds a 3D image of the patient, as a sum of many small volumes (voxels) of data. The whole patient may be thought of as a loaf of bread. Each CT image is a slice of bread that is viewed on the cut surface. The loaf may be sliced in any direction. This modality is ideal for examination of complex body parts (i.e., skull, pelvis, vertebrae) where superimposed, irregularly shaped structures make radiographs challenging to interpret. CT is ideal for examination of the thorax (chest) and abdomen (belly) for small masses that may not be apparent by routine radiographs or ultrasound exam. CT is helpful for evaluation of the skull and brain in cases of acute head trauma when skull fractures and recent bleeding are a concern. Assessment of the temporomandibular joints, temporal bullae, nasal passages, sinuses, pharynx, larynx, orbit and periorbital structures, maxilla and mandible are common applications of this modality. Identifying the extent of a soft tissue or bone mass for surgery or radiation therapy planning is also done by CT.

Neurology

Veterinary Neurology is the branch of medicine that treats diseases of the nervous system: the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles in pets. This specialty encompasses such common problems as epilepsy, herniated disks, spinal and head injuries, meningitis, and cancers of the nervous system.

A board certified veterinary neurologist is a licensed veterinarian who has obtained additional intensive training in veterinary neurology and has been certified by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) to specialize in veterinary neurology.While your regular veterinarian can diagnose and treat many health problems, certain diseases and conditions require the care of a doctor who has had specialized, intensive training in veterinary neurology in order to provide the very best outcome for your pet.

Why Does My Pet Need A Veterinary Neurologist? 

Just as your own primary care physician may feel the need to refer you to the care of a specialist from time to time, your general practitioner veterinarian may feel your pet needs a veterinary neurologist to help diagnose or treat a problem. You can be assured that a veterinarian who knows when to refer you and your pet for more specialized diagnostic work or treatment is one that is caring and committed to ensuring that your pet receives the highest standard of medical care for his or her condition.

Specifically, veterinary neurologists can provide the following:

  • A thorough neurologic examination and localization
  • Brain and spinal cord imaging, including CT scans
  • MRI, ultrasound, myelography, and radiography
  • Spinal fluid tap and analysis.Intensive care
  • Neurosurgery of the brain, skull, spine, and peripheral nervous system
  • Electrophysiologic examination of nerves and muscles
  • Knowledge of clinical trials available to pets with specific neurologic disorder

Will My Regular Veterinarian Still Be Involved?

Your veterinarian will receive a copy of your pet’s medical records for every visit. We work in partnership with your veterinarian to provide necessary follow up care and monitoring.

Our Neurology Services

Cerebrospinal Fluid Collection and Analysis
CT Scan Brain Bullae Skull Spine
Electromyography EMG
Nerve Conduction Velocity NCV

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