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Tomo Wiggans

DVM, MEng, DACVO
Dr. Tomo Wiggans
Veterinary Specialist
Ophthalmology
Dr. Tomo Wiggans

At a Glance

Practicing Since:

2010

Board Certified:

Veterinary Ophthalmology

My Pets:

Izzy - Dog
Kaya - Cat
Mama - Cat
Wally - Cat
Ten Chickens
Four Ducks
Tomo Wiggans is originally from Maryland and attended Cornell University, earning a Bachelor of Science (BS) in 2001 and a Master of Engineering (MEng) in 2002. After working as an engineer for several years, he attended veterinary school at UC Davis, graduating with his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree in 2010. Following veterinary school, Dr. Wiggans completed both a one year rotating internship and a one year specialty fellowship at Colorado State University. He then completed a three-year residency in comparative veterinary ophthalmology at UC Davis. Dr. Wiggans became a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist in 2015.

Dr. Wiggans enjoys working with clients and their pets to treat painful ocular conditions and provide the best possible visual outcomes. He also really enjoys working in a multi-specialty environment, collaborating with other specialists to provide high quality care for animals. His professional interests include reconstructive blepharoplastic surgery, cataract surgery, and ocular manifestations of systemic disease. When not at work, Dr. Wiggans enjoys landscape photography, traveling, hiking, camping, and baking. He has one dog, Izzy, three cats, Kaya, Mama, and Wally, ten chickens, and four ducks.

Ophthalmology

What Is A Veterinary Ophthalmologist?

A veterinary ophthalmologist is a doctor who specializes in diseases that can affect your pet's eye and vision. A veterinary ophthalmologist is also equipped to diagnose and treat diseases that affect the structures surrounding the eye, such as the eyelids, conjunctiva, and some of the bones of the skull that comprise the eye socket. A veterinary ophthalmologist will combine medical and surgical treatments in order to most effectively treat your pet's eye problem.

While your general practitioner veterinarian can diagnose and treat many routine eye conditions, certain diseases and injuries require the care of a doctor who has had specialized, intensive training in veterinary ophthalmology in order to provide the very best outcome for your pet.

Pet eye diseases that you may be familiar with as a result of your own visits to a human ophthalmologist include cataracts, glaucoma, retinal detachments, and corneal ulcers.

Why Does My Pet Need A Veterinary Ophthalmologist?

While your general practitioner veterinarian can handle many aspects of your pet's care, just as in human medicine, sometimes there is a need for the attention of a specialist. If your pet has a complicated or difficult problem, your pet may need the care of a veterinary ophthalmologist. You can be assured that a veterinarian who knows when to refer you and your pet for more specialized diagnostic work or treatment is one that is caring and committed to ensuring your pet receives the highest standard of medical care for his or her problem.

While in some cases, your veterinarian may be able to simply consult with a specialist about your pet's care, in other cases it is necessary to actually refer you and your pet to the specialist for more advanced diagnostics and treatment, including surgery.

What Special Problems Does A Veterinary Ophthalmologist Treat?

Routine eye matters can frequently be handled by your general practitioner veterinarian. The conditions listed below, however, frequently require the attention of a specialist.

  • Cataracts
  • Corneal ulcer
  • Entropion
  • Glaucoma
  • Prolapsed gland of the nictitans (cherry eye)
  • Uveitis
  • Lens luxation
  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye)
  • Herpetic Keratitis in Cats
  • Proliferative Keratoconjunctivitis in Cats

Will My Regular Veterinarian Still Be Involved?

Your veterinary ophthalmologist will work together with your veterinarian as part of your pet's total veterinary health care team. Your general practitioner veterinarian will still oversee all aspects of your pet's care, but with the added, specialized input of a veterinary ophthalmologist. For example, if a veterinary ophthalmologist ultimately diagnoses diabetes in your pet as a result of an eye examination for cataracts, that information will be relayed back to your general practitioner veterinarian, who will treat your pet's diabetes. The additional input of the veterinary ophthalmologist will be called upon as needed as your veterinarian manages your pet's illness.

Did You Know?

  • Do you know why your pet's eyes seem to glow when caught in the light at night? It's because of a specialized structure called a tapetum. Most animals that are active at night have this special, additional layer underneath their retina. This reflective structure acts like a mirror, and reflects light back through your pet's retina to enhance night vision.
  • Do dogs see only in black and white? While we can't ask them, most veterinary ophthalmologists now believe that dogs see colors similarly to how a color blind human would perceive them: Not only in black and white, but with a limited scale of colors.

Does your cat or dog need a veterinary ophthalmologist?

Please feel free to call our Ophthalmology Department at any time for further information or to arrange a consultation.

VCA Bay Area Veterinary Specialists & Emergency Hospital

14790 Washington Ave.

San Leandro, CA 94578

Main: 510-483-7387

Fax: 510-483-7389

Hospital Hours:

    Mon-Sun: Open 24 hours

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