We’re committed to keeping clients and staff safe during COVID-19 with NEW admittance and check-out processes. Learn more.

Margo Mehl

DVM, DACVS-SA
Margo Mehl
Veterinary Specialist
Surgery
Margo Mehl

At a Glance

Practicing Since:

1999

Board Certified:

Surgery

Specialties Include:

Soft tissue surgery 
Oncologic surgery
Orthopedic cases

My Pets:

Riley & Pluto - Labrador Retrievers
Rocket Space Shuttle - Boston Terrier
Benjamin - French Bulldog

Dr. Margo Mehl graduated from Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1999. While in veterinary school she received a number of awards including GPSA Travel Award, Richland Kennel Club Scholarship, George G. Ross Scholarship, and was the Mark Morris Student representative. She then proceeded to do a rotating internship at Colorado State University School of Veterinary Medicine followed by a 3-year small animal surgical residency at the University of California, Davis. She completed her surgery board examinations in 2004, at which time she became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons. She was recruited to stay on an additional year after her residency at UC Davis for a fellowship in renal transplantation and vascular surgery, After completing the fellowship she was accepted for a tenure-track faculty position at the UC Davis Small Animal Surgery department. She remained in a UC Davis Small Animal Surgery faculty position as an assistant professor training students and residents, predominantly in soft tissue and oncologic surgeries from 2005-2008. She was the section leader for the Educational Commission for Foreign Veterinary Graduates Clinical Proficiency Exam from 2004-2008. Dr. Mehl has published numerous research papers in peer-reviewed journals and acquired many grants for her research. Her research specialized in kidney transplantation, liver shunt surgery, ureteral surgery and immunosuppression therapy. In 2008, she left her faculty position at UC Davis and came to San Francisco Veterinary Specialists (SFVS) where she has been working for the past 9 years performing a multitude of surgeries. She continues to author book chapters and is frequently invited to review research papers in her field of expertise. She is currently a member of the following medical organizations: American College of Veterinary Surgeons (2004), Society for Veterinary Soft Tissue Surgery (2004), American Veterinary Medical Association (2004), San Francisco Veterinary Medical Association (2008), Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology (2015).

Dr. Mehl has authored more than 25 publications in peer-reviewed journals covering many surgical diseases such as laryngeal disorders and treatment, adrenal tumors, bone tumors, liver shunts in small and large breed dogs, kidney transplantation, feline ureteral surgery, episoplasty in dogs, laparoscopic surgery, tracheal surgery and thoracic surgery. She has also authored a number of book chapters including those on liver shunts in dogs and cats, hiatal hernia repair, organ transplantation and laryngeal paralysis.  

Papers Authored
Results of Clinical Renal Transplantation in 15 Dogs Using Triple Drug Immunosuppressive Therapy

Objective: To evaluate outcome of renal transplantation in dogs administered cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone immunosuppression.
Authored By: Gregory CR, Kyles AE, Bernsteen L, Mehl M.
Published: Vet Surg 2006 Feb;35(2):105-12. 

Ischemic Injury as a Contributory Factor to Delayed Graft Function in Cats Undergoing Renal Autotransplantation

Authored By: Mehl ML, Kyles AE, Reimer SB, Flynn A, Pollard RE, Nyland T, Kass PH, Griffey SM, Gregory CR
Published: Vet Surg 2006 Jun;35(4):341-6

Survival Analysis of One Versus Two Treatments of Local Delivery Cisplatin in a Biodegradable Polymer for Osteosarcoma

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate one versus two doses of local delivery cisplatin in a biodegradable polymer (OPLA-Pt) for the treatment of osteosarcoma (OSA) after amputation in dogs. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively, and 105 dogs were included in the study; 39% of dogs received one treatment (surgical implantation) of OPLA-Pt and 61% of dogs received two treatments of OPLA-Pt after amputation. Administration of two doses of OPLA-Pt did not have a significant effect on disease-free interval or survival time compared to one dose. The anatomic site of the tumour was identified as a prognostic factor, and dogs with proximal humeral OSA had the shortest disease-free interval and survival times. There was no advantage to giving a second dose of local delivery cisplatin following amputation for the treatment of OSA in dogs.
Authored: Mehl ML, Seguin B, Withrow SJ, Dernell WS, Lafferty M, Kass PH
Published: Comp Oncol 2005 3(2)81-86

What’s Your Diagnosis? Hepatic Duct Avulsion in a Dog

Authored: Filipowicz DE, Mehl ML, Kyles AE
Published: J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004 Dec 15;225(12):1831-2

Comparison of 3 Techniques for Ureteroneocystostomy in Cats

Objective: To compare 3 techniques for ureteroneocystostomy in cats.
Authored: Mehl ML, Kyles AE, Pollard R, Jackson J, Kass PH, Griffey SM, Gregory CR
Published: Vet Surg 2005 Mar-Apr;34(2):114-9

Evaluation of Ameroid Ring Constrictors for Treatment of Single Extrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts in Dogs

Objective: To evaluate use of an ameroid ring constrictor (ARC) for treatment for single extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (PSSs) and identify factors associated with postoperative death, continued portosystemic shunting, and long-term outcome in dogs.
Authored: Mehl ML, Kyles AE, Hardie EM, Kass PH, Adin CA, Flynn A, De Cock H, Gregory CR
Published: J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005 Jun 15;226(12):2020-30

Our Surgery Team

Veterinary Specialist
VCA San Francisco Veterinary Specialists

600 Alabama Street

San Francisco, CA 94110

Main: 415-401-9200

Fax: 415-401-9201

Hospital Hours:

    Mon-Sun: 7:00 am - 12:00 am

Emergency and Specialty Contact:

Fax Number:
415-401-9201

Email Us at [email protected]

Prescription Refill Request

Are you a Primary Care Veterinarian? We have dedicated resources for you.

Loading... Please wait