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Our hospital offers a variety of Dentistry Services. At your pet's yearly examination it may be determined that they require a dental cleaning. Routine veterinary dentistry involves prophylaxis (teeth cleaning), polishing and a full oral examination.

Dental prophylaxis is performed with your pet under general anesthesia. It involves cleaning the surface of each tooth and scaling below the gumline, where food, bacteria, and tartar build up. To ensure the safety of your pet, pre-operative blood work will be performed prior to the anesthesia.

During a dental procedure, your veterinarian evaluates your pet's teeth for fractures, caries (cavities), excessive wear, and other abnormalities. Your veterinarian will also examine around the gums to detect periodontal disease.

Sometimes teeth need to be pulled (extracted). Dental x-rays, if available, aid in selection of teeth to be pulled and to aid in evaluation of periodontal and other oral diseases. If your pet is found to have more advanced dental or periodontal disease, your veterinarian may recommend more specialized procedures or referral to a board certified veterinary dentist

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Dentistry

Dental disease is an often-overlooked threat to the comfort and health of your pet. Because dental disease often has few readily apparent signs, bringing your pet in for a wellness examination is the only way to ensure detection. Following this exam, your veterinarian may recommend a particular dental cleaning schedule, oral care routine, or special treatment based on your pet’s dental health needs.

Some of the special treatment your veterinarian may suggest is possible extractions of one or more teeth, fluoride treatments and most recently, Doxirobe (doxycycline) treatments. We also use digital dental X-rays to fully examine your pet’s oral health by viewing the teeth below the gumline as well as the condition of the bone.

Should your veterinarian recommend more invasive procedures such as root canal therapy or management of oral tumors (maxillary/mandibulary), we have Dr. Katrina Hall-Essoe (board certified veterinary dentist) and Dr. Marissa Berman (currently undergoing her residency to become board certified in veterinary dentistry) on staff to support your pet’s specialized needs.

How do I know if my pet has dental disease?
Dental disease is the most common disease seen by veterinarians: 70-85% of pets over the age of 2 have some form of dental disease. Here are some signs that your pet may have dental disease:

  • Bad breath
  • Yellow, brown, or discolored teeth
  • Loose teeth
  • Red, inflamed gums
  • Swollen mouth, jaws, or gums
  • Doesn’t play with chew toys as often
  • Pain when eating

It is important to have your pet checked for dental disease, as this disease can have major impacts on your pet’s organs, including the heart, liver, and kidneys.

Does my pet have to stay overnight after the dental procedure?
Generally, routine dentals are an outpatient procedure. Patients check-in between 7 am and 8 am. The procedure is performed in the late morning to early afternoon. Patients are ready to return home after 5 pm the same day. Pets receiving advanced dental procedures with X-rays and extractions are still discharged the same day.

How long can my pet go between dental cleanings?
Some dogs (usually small breeds) can require a dental up to every 6 months. Some dogs can go 3 to 4 years between dental cleanings. Typically, after the age of 2 or 3, most dogs and cats will need a dental every year. Assessment by your veterinarian will allow you to discuss your pet’s dental health and if excessive plaque or periodontal disease requires a cleaning.

Remember, good oral hygiene at home increases the time between professional cleanings.

How will dental care benefit my pet?

  • Reduced plaque and tartar
  • Decreased oral infections
  • Helps prevent bad breath
  • Helps prevent heart, liver, and kidney disease as caused by dental disease

How do I schedule a dental appointment?
Please call 925-937-5001; our receptionists will then put you in contact with the Dentistry department, as they schedule all of their own appointments. In addition, they are typically available Tuesday-Saturday, and function as their own separate entity under EBVSE.

Dental Department Client Forms
Dental Patient History & Questionnaire

Our Dentistry Services

Dental Radiographs
Dentistry Overview
Endodontics
Oral Surgery

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