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Myelography is a contrast iodinated radiographic study used to highlight the spinal cord within the vertebral canal. While survey vertebral column radiographs do not allow visualization of the spinal cord or the meninges, Myelography with the use of radiographs as described above, allows visualization of the outline of the spinal cord.

The procedure is technical and performed by veterinarians experienced with the procedure. The procedure is carried out under anesthesia. A spinal needle is introduced into the spinal canal as for a spinal tap. For myelography of the entire spine usually lumbar puncture at L4-5 or L5-6 is performed (low back area). After sterile surgical preparation of the skin, the needle is inserted into the subarachnoid space. This space lies between the outer meninges (fibrous covering of the spinal cord) and the spinal cord itself. This space is filled with spinal fluid. The contrast agent is slowly and gently instilled with care until the entire spinal cord can be visualized into the high neck region.

Myelography for many years was the only way to further image the spinal cord. Although it does not allow for imaging the spinal cord itself, because the contrast agent surrounds and thus highlights the spinal cord, it can provide information on diseases causing compression from the outside the cord but within the canal (extra-dural), within the meninges (intra-dural, extramedullary) and also within the spinal cord (intramedullary).

Examples of extradural diseases include: intervertebral disc extrusion, tumors, cysts, infection, hemorrhage, compression from malformation, fracture or instability and other. Examples of intradural-extramedullary diseases include tumors or infection of the meninges/nerve roots, and cysts or dilations or adhesions of the meningeal elements. Intramedullary diseases include tumors of the spinal cord itself, ischemic stroke, hemorrhage, infection, inflammation, cavities (syrinx), traumatic high velocity intervertebral disc rupture and others.

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Neurology

What Is Veterinary Neurology?

Veterinary Neurology is the branch of medicine that treats diseases of the nervous system: the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles in pets. This encompasses such common problems as epilepsy, herniated disks, spinal and head injuries, meningitis, and cancers of the nervous system. A board certified veterinary neurologist is a licensed veterinarian who has obtained additional intensive training in veterinary neurology and has been certified by either the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) in the United States or the European College of Veterinary Neurology (ECVN) in Europe to specialize in veterinary neurology.

While your general practitioner veterinarian can diagnose and treat many health problems, certain diseases and conditions require the care of a doctor who has had specialized, intensive training in veterinary neurology in order to provide the very best outcome for your pet.

Why Does My Pet Need A Veterinary Neurologist?

Just as your own primary care physician may feel the need to refer you to the care of a specialist from time to time, your general practitioner veterinarian may feel your pet needs a veterinary neurologist to help diagnose or treat a problem. While your general practitioner veterinarian can handle many aspects of your pet's care, just as in human medicine, there is sometimes a need for the attention of a specialist. You can be assured that a veterinarian who knows when to refer you and your pet for more specialized diagnostic work or treatment is one that is caring and committed to ensuring that your pet receives the highest standard of medical care for his or her condition.

Specifically, veterinary neurologists can provide the following:
  • A thorough neurologic examination, which may be videotaped for future reference.
  • Brain and spinal cord imaging, including CT and bone scans, MRI, ultrasound, myelography, and radiography.
  • Spinal fluid tap and analysis.
  • Intensive care.
  • Neurosurgery of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerve system.
  • Electrophysiologic examination of nerves and muscles.
  • Knowledge of clinical trials available to pets with specific neurologic disorders.

Will My Regular Veterinarian Still Be Involved?

In many cases, your regular veterinarian will still supervise your pet's veterinary care, especially if your pet is coping with multiple disease states or conditions. In other cases, your referral doctor will take over the majority of your pet's medical care for the duration of its referred treatment. It depends on your pet's particular problem.

Did You Know?

  • In an emergency, the safest way to transport a seizuring or unconscious pet to its veterinarian, for both you and the pet, is in an airline crate.
  • There are less than 100 veterinary neurologists in the United States today.
  • Seizures are the most common neurological problem in companion animals.
  • Intervertebral disk disease is the most common spinal cord problem in dogs.

Our Neurology Services

Cerebrospinal Fluid Collection and Analysis
Dorsal Laminectomy (cervical and lumbosacral)
Electromyography (EMG)
Hemilaminectomy

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