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Rhinoscopy is the endoscopic study of the nasal passages. This procedure is often combined with CT scan to evaluate patients with ongoing nasal problems, including congestion and discharge. Rhinoscopy can be performed with both flexible and rigid scopes. Small-diameter scopes are utilized to adequately evaluate small dogs and cats. To perform rhinoscopy, the patient is anesthetized and the scope is gently inserted into the nasal cavity. Fluid is flushed through a protective sleeve surrounding the scope to flush away debris. The scope also magnifies the image to provide a clear view of the nasal area. Many scopes have built-in openings to allow passage of biopsy or retrieval instruments. Little patient preparation is required other than to withhold food the morning of the procedure. Most patients are discharged the same day that the procedure is performed.

The major symptoms and reasons to perform a rhinoscopy are:

  • Persistent nasal discharge especially when the discharge is only from one nostril (unilateral)
  • Nasal bleeding (epistaxis)
  • Persistent, uncontrolled sneezing
  • Nasal swelling
  • Noisy breathing (nasal obstruction)
  • Removing foreign matter from inside the nose
  • Reverse sneezing
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Internal Medicine

A board-certified veterinary internal medicine specialist is a veterinarian who completed an internship and residency (an additional 3-5 years of training after graduation from veterinary school) and passed a rigorous examination to achieve board certification in the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM). These doctors have a deeper understanding of a pet’s internal body systems, as well as greater knowledge of unusual or uncommon conditions in pets.

Often called the “puzzle solvers of veterinary medicine”, board-certified veterinary internal medicine specialists have advanced training in disorders affecting the kidneys, liver, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, blood & bone marrow, and hormone-producing organs. Common diseases that affect these organs include:

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Canine hypothyroidism
  • Pneumonia
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Canine chronic bronchitis
  • Chronic cholangitis in cats
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Cushing’s disease
  • Liver shunting disorders
  • Feline asthma
  • Addison’s disease
  • Chronic-active hepatitis
  • Feline hyperthyroidism
  • Infectious diseases (i.e.: tick-borne infections; fungal ailments)
  • Immune-mediated diseases

Our board-certified veterinary internal medicine specialists and their team of experienced licensed veterinary technicians use state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment and employ therapeutic interventions not generally used by family veterinarians, including:

  • Ultrasonography (abdominal, thoracic, and cervical)
  • Fine needle aspiration
  • Upper & lower gastroenteroscopy
  • Laparoscopy for liver biopsies
  • Cystoscopy
  • Feeding tube placement
  • Arthrocentesis (joint fluid sampling)
  • Bone marrow sampling
  • Computed tomography (CT/CAT scan)

To help ensure pets receive the best possible healthcare, our internal medicine team collaborates with family veterinarians by providing second opinions, complex diagnostic procedures, around-the-clock nursing care, and specialized therapies.

Our Internal Medicine Services

Abdominocentesis
Bronchoalveolar Lavage BAL
Bronchoscopy
Colonoscopy

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