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In our hospital’s state-of-the-art ICU, we have the capability of doing intermittent or continuous central venous pressures to estimate blood volume in our patients. We are also capable of doing continuous EKG so that we can monitor for arrhythmias in our patients under anesthesia for surgical, endoscopic, and dental procedures. Continuous EKG monitoring is also performed for patients with heart disease and critical patients in our ICU, and for patients that are heavily sedated for procedures such as laceration repairs and other minor surgeries.

Emergency & Critical Care

While your general practice veterinarian can diagnose and treat many health problems and handle many routine emergencies, certain situations require the care of a doctor who has had training in handling emergency and critical care for your pet. An emergency and critical care doctor typically works in tandem with your general practice veterinarian on a referral basis, as well as with any other needed specialists, until the emergency is resolved.

How Can I Find An Emergency and Critical Care Facility for My Pet?

You can also look for emergency specialists in your area on the ACVECC website. You can be assured that a veterinarian who knows when and where to refer you and your pet for emergency or critical care is one that is caring and committed to ensuring that your pet receives the highest standard of care for his or her problem.

When Does My Pet Need Emergency Care?

Any of the following situations can be considered an emergency:

  • Difficulty breathing or severe coughing
  • Ingestion of a foreign object, drug, poison or unknown substance
  • Bleeding or unexplained bruising
  • Blood in vomit, feces or urine
  • Severe vomiting, retching, or diarrhea
  • Swollen, hard or painful abdomen
  • Serious wound
  • Suspected broken limb
  • Any injury to the eye
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Seizures
  • Inability to move or sudden weakness
  • Unusual or erratic behavior
  • Signs of extreme pain
  • Straining to urinate (especially a male cat)
  • Labor that does not progress
  • Prolonged heat exposure, overheating or heat stroke 
  • Snake bite

What Is Critical Care?

While an emergency is unfolding, or throughout recovery from a serious illness or accident, ongoing diagnostic and therapeutic care and constant monitoring of your pet's condition are required. Many emergency and critical care facilities offer 24-hour supervision of critically ill pets and, just as in human hospitals, may have dedicated Intensive Care and Critical Care Units (ICU/CCU). Such facilities are equipped to provide oxygen therapy, cardiac monitoring, blood transfusions, and nutritional support. Such facilities also typically have advanced diagnostic capabilities onsite, such as ultrasound and echocardiography.

Will My Regular Veterinarian Still Be Involved?

Many emergency hospitals work on a referral basis with general practitioners. In some cases, your pet will only be referred to the emergency service for after-hours care. In other cases, your pet may be in the care of the emergency and critical care doctor for the duration of the emergency and recovery, but then referred back to your general practitioner for follow up and routine care.

Our Emergency & Critical Care Services

Cardiac Output Monitoring
Continuous ECG Monitoring and Telemetry
Direct Blood Pressure Monitoring
Emergency & Critical Care Overview

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